Category Archive: News

Running Out of Time

“People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect but actually, from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint, it’s more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly, timey wimey- stuff.”

For some of us, the end of August marks the beginning of packed lunches, after-school practice and class projects. With summer break hours coming to an end, the resurgence of the weekly calendar is more important than ever. Whether you are with or without kids, the annual school schedule affects us all. Even for the best of us, time management is daily work. From sun up to sun down, we do our best to pack our schedules with our daily activities, both personal and professional, in the hopes of staying on track and keeping a good balance. Yet, often times, we see ourselves running out of juice and wondering where the day went; wishing we had either more hours or more energy or quote frankly, both! Do you feel yourself losing grip of your schedule? Could it be that we are overcommitting our time?

Overcommitment & Self Care

When we find ourselves drowning in our workload, the first thing to be affected is often self-care. We push reading time for laundry time, gym time for making dinner time and so forth since items that pertain to personal enjoyment are always the first to go. We feel like we’re accommodating priorities without realizing that we are a priority. Eventually, pushing time to make up for these important tasks leads to less sleep at night, a bad mood the following morning and the beginning turns of a harmful cycle. Furthermore, as Veronica Arreola states for Experience Life, ” I was working hard to keep up,” she says. “But I wore myself out, got sick, and fell behind because of missed time from work. Too many of us pack our calendars full. We commit to more than we can handle, assuming that we’ll squeeze it all in somehow. Often, we ignore the consequences.”

Techno Woes

While the problem of over scheduling is not new to this generation, it is extrapolated by the technology we accolade with being “time saving” and “making life easier.” In our pockets and purses we hold a device that streams pure information within inches of your face, 24 hours a day, 7 days week. While in the past we could close our computers and leave the office, today we have email and calendar notifications that follows us out of the office and keeps us connected at all times. Not to mention the plethora of work environments which span countries and time zones alike where disconnecting is not a possibility. In addition, the constant connectivity makes it impossible to set boundaries and limits.

Time to Task Up

Like any problem we experience, the first step is admitting that one exists in the first place. The next step is to breaking down your day to spot where the over scheduling is occurring and working to do your best to break this addiction. According to the Experience Life article,  the three steps to doing so are acknowledging your limits, observing your patterns and clarifying the values that are your life worth living in the first place.

Set up a routine. Routines will help to give your daily schedule a base foundation to build on. These are items (walk the dog, pack lunches, go to the gym) that you know how long it will take to complete and which you know need to be completed every day. Doing this on a weekly basis will give you a better understanding on the amount of “free time” you truly have.

Build buffer zones. Avoid “cramming” things into your schedule for the sake of getting things done. This is the equivalent of making a to-do list of 40 items off the bat. You are setting yourself up for failure and at the same time adding anxiety to overall process. Pick 5 items at a time, on level of priority, that need to be completed and give yourself 15-30 minutes between them to refresh your mind. This allows yourself not only to wipe the slate clean for the following task but also allows you buffer room for unexpected emergencies.

Know when you work best. Especially in this day and age, we no longer find ourselves locked into a traditional 9-5 job. Let’s face it. This is not your grandparent’s world anymore. Some of us are single parents, some of us have two jobs, others have a day job and school at night. We must learn to focus on our time and energy and mold it to the most efficient caliber. Take a moment to step and back and analyze your routine. Figure out your personal schedule and when you work best. What time of the day you have the most energy and center your most pressing, time and mentally consuming tasks around that time.

Understand your limits. This is a tough one. We are the generation that avoids two trips to unload the groceries. We are driven to overcome barriers and obstacles. We are invincible, yes, but sometimes we need to head back down to the ground and face the reality of understanding our limits. Peer pressure plays a huge role in our decisions; the inability to say no to your boss or your best friend. We need to understand our limits. Introduce new tasks to your routine by doubling the estimated time you think it will take to complete. Repeat the task 2-3 times until you can determine the average time of completion and whether it fits into your routine. Most importantly, learn to say no. (Yes, Mom, I hear you loud and clear.) But she was right. The world will continue if you say no to an event or turn down an extra project you don’t have realistic time or energy to complete.

Whether you are a student, a professional  or an athlete, we can all use some extra help when it comes to time management. Use this week to take notes on your daily routines and strategize your best move forward. Create a foundation and levy tasks to the best of your ability. Take note on what works for you, what doesn’t, what needs to be approved. We are creatures of routine. It will get easier. You just have to start.

A.T.

Experience Life Team. Experience Life. “Back on Schedule.”https://experiencelife.com/article/back-on-schedule-2/”
Photo Credit: Doctor Who Series 8, Title Sequence: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EvX2-LHwYA4

Go with the Pro’s

Triathletes kick off from the pier into the Hudson to commence the swim leg of the event

 

With the 2017 2XU New York City Triathlon weekend just around the corner, we could not help but notice the messages and mutterings. We’d like to preface by stating how immensely proud we are of each and every one of our participants. Our athletes will be descending to the Big Apple from all over the United States and 15 different countries. But, if we are being completely honest, there’s a select group of individuals who bring a certain glean of awe-inspiring, static magic to the weekend.

Let’s face it, we were all glued to the swimming portion of the Olympics broadcast but there were a handful of athletes that really got our adrenaline pumping. These are individuals who push and transcend barriers of time and endurance to carve out new horizons for the potential of the human body.

 

Professional Athletes

We are proud to host a professional race at the New York City Triathlon! As in past years, the International distance race will remain “draft-free” and the pros will swim, bike and run on the same course as the Age Group athletes. The weekend offers a total of $30,000 in cash awards, and includes plenty of opportunities for self-promotion.

Equalizer Timing Format

The 2017 2XU New York City Triathlon will use an equalizer timing format for the pro field with the pro men chasing the pro women for a $3,000 cash prize.
Please Note: The time differential (from the female pro start to male pro start) will be announced later this week.

Pro Race Considerations
Full perks are listed below in more detail:

Total Pro Purse: $24,000 (F/M)           Equalizer Bonus: $3,000               Discipline Preems: $3,000 (F/M)
1stPlace: $6,000                                                                                            Fastest Swim Split: $500
2ndPlace: $4,000                                                                                           Fastest Bike: $500
3rdPlace: $2,000                                                                                            Fastest Run: $500

 

The 2017 2XU New York City Triathlon Pro’s List 

 

2017 NYC Tri Athlete & Spectator Guide Now Available

“In New York, concrete jungle where dreams are made of, there’s nothing you can’t do.”

The city of lights. The city of opportunity. The Big Apple.  Nothing says New York more than the Hudson River, the West Side Highway and Central Park! Since its inception, the New York City Triathlon has been a stage for Olympians, Paralympians and tough-as-nails New Yorkers. Each section of the course tests your preparation and commitment.

Some say you’re a real New Yorker if you live here for two years. We say you’re a real New Yorker if you’ve conquered the New York City Triathlon. If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere. Make sure to check out the 2016 Athlete and Spectator Guide* for detailed schedules, course information and more.

> 2017 NYC Athlete Guide – UPDATED

> 2017 NYC Spectator Guide

A city with a thousand names and dreams, it’s your time to make your Tri dreams come true!

See you in the Hudson!

*Please note: Both Guides will be updated with Swim Wave Charts as we get closer to the event.

NYC Tri Spring Training Webinar

Spring has sprung in New York City — so it’s time to get training! Dr. Mark Klion of Manhattan Orthopedic is here to help you jumpstart your race prep with expert tips covering training and injury prevention.

Join us on May 17 at 7:00 p.m. EST

** NOTE: This webinar has been rescheduled from its original date. Those previously registered for the original date (May 9) will automatically remain registered for the revised session. Thank you for your understanding.

> CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

These Three Women Define Strength

To recognize International Women’s Day, IRONMAN did a virtual sit-down with three of triathlon’s most inspiring women. Read on to find out their views on life and triathlon.

by Jennifer Ward


Christina Hopper: Mother of three and the first female African-American fighter pilot to face combat in a major war.

Has triathlon altered or affected how you see yourself as a woman? If so, how?

It has altered how I see myself as a person. I was an athlete when I was young, but after completing college, I didn’t really compete in sports anymore. When I took up triathlon three years ago, I rediscovered a part of myself that I thought had died. It has given me a renewed sense of confidence and vigor. It has given me renewed energy and helped me to see that age is a state of mind.

What has been one of the biggest challenges you’ve faced personally as a woman, an athlete, or both?

One of the biggest challenges I have faced as a triathlete is balancing life demands with all of the training and trying to reach my goals. In order to garner and maintain the support of my husband and family, I had to decide that my goal was not going to be “to be the best.” That goal would have required me to put my life on hold to train. Instead, I set the goal that I would “be the best that I could be within the time constraints of my life.” I set realistic goals within those constraints and feel good about what I was accomplishing both at home and in sport.

What are your tips for balancing training with a full life?

I think one of the most important things to remember is that triathlon is not your life, it’s just a part of your life. If you keep that in perspective, things fall into their proper place. You don’t need to fit someone else’s training plan into your life. Do what makes sense for your schedule. For me, that usually means getting up early and getting training in before my kids are up and before work.

What do you wish you’d known when you started triathlon? What’s your best tip for a first-time female triathlete?

I wish I would have known that it is better to go into a race slightly underprepared than it is to go in overtrained. There were so many times when I thought I just needed to get in a few extra miles or to go a little bit faster than planned and then I ended up injured. Now I live by the motto: “train smarter, not harder.” Being strategic in training and listening to your body when it tells you to back off or rest goes a long way toward longevity in the sport and success in reaching your goals.

As part at Women For Tri, we are doing a “Women for Tri Workout Wednesday” where we encourage women to celebrate the day by working out together, empowering each other, and sharing their photos. Is there anything you’d like to to say to all the women working out on that day?

I, too, have a group of friends I train with regularly. We call ourselves the Before Breakfast Club. Getting up early and training with them is therapy for me. I think it is wonderful to train with other women to share ideas, successes and failures, and encouragement. It is a natural forum to learn from each other and to celebrate the achievement of goals. Doing life together with others and building others up makes life worth living.


Shirin Gerami: The first woman to represent Iran in a triathlon.

Has triathlon altered or affected how you see yourself as a woman? If so, how?

It has definitely affected me as a human being. I feel it has given me a more positive outlook on life, and given me more confidence in working hard towards my goals.

What has been one of the biggest challenges you’ve faced personally as a woman, an athlete, or both?

The constant labelling, stereotyping, and boxing into how/what/who I ought to be, and the challenge of concentrating on who I am and the person I want to grow into, rather than binding myself to what other people expect and assume me to be. That has actually been a huge challenge.

What are your tips for balancing training with a full life?

I wish I had the answer! I’m still trying to figure that out myself.

What do you wish you’d known when you started triathlon? What’s your best tip for a first-time female triathlete?

I have loved the journey exactly as it has been. The thrill and curiosity of the unknown, the surprises, the growth, the ups, downs and up-side downs. Passing on what Paula Newby Fraser has always told me: “don’t overthink it.”


Turia Pitt: Inspirational Australian woman who suffered burns to 65% of her body in 2011. She completed two IRONMAN events in 2016.

Has triathlon altered or affected how you see yourself as a woman? If so, how?

It’s given me a lot more confidence and a lot more belief in my abilities, especially since I set the goal of doing an IRONMAN when I was in a hospital bed. I think just having that goal is something massive to work toward. As I got closer and closer to it, it made me believe in myself a lot more. I think having that self belief and self confidence that’s crucial for anyone in all stages of their lives.

What has been one of the biggest challenges you’ve faced personally as a woman, an athlete, or both?

As an athlete, it’s got to be my injuries. I’ve only got three fingers now which makes swimming more difficult, and it’s harder for me to use my bike like a normal person would. As a woman, we have a tendency to not back ourselves and not believe in ourselves and I think that’s a pretty big challenge. And also, because the sport of triathlon is fairly male dominated, even just finding training partners was really difficult for me. I guess I’m luckier than most because my partner was very fit so I’d do a lot of training with him. I still think if there were more women in the sport that would be really good for everyone.

What are your tips for balancing training with a full life?

I think my tip is that I had to learn to let myself off the hook. If I didn’t do very well in a training session or was really tired and didn’t go as hard as I would’ve liked or didn’t eat my recovery meals at the right time—I think you’ve just got to recognize that no one’s perfect and we’re all just doing the best we can. In the scheme of things if you miss a session or your day doesn’t go as planned it’s not the end of the world.

What do you wish you’d known when you started triathlon? What’s your best tip for a first-time female triathlete?

To not take it too seriously. It’s a sport that we all do because we love it, and I think you can forget about that and get really serious. That for me saps all the fun and enjoyment out of it.

As part at Women For Tri, we are doing a “Women for Tri Workout Wednesday” where we encourage women to celebrate the day by working out together, empowering each other, and sharing their photos. Is there anything you’d like to to say to all the women working out on that day?

I’d say dream big, believe in yourself, and know that if you put the work in, you’ll see results!

 

Originally from: http://www.ironman.com/triathlon/news/articles/2017/03/international-womens-day-round-table.aspx#ixzz4akIexN29

These Three Women Define Strength

To recognize International Women’s Day, IRONMAN did a virtual sit-down with three of triathlon’s most inspiring women. Read on to find out their views on life and triathlon.

 

 

 

 

by Jennifer Ward


Christina Hopper: Mother of three and the first female African-American fighter pilot to face combat in a major war.

Has triathlon altered or affected how you see yourself as a woman? If so, how?

It has altered how I see myself as a person. I was an athlete when I was young, but after completing college, I didn’t really compete in sports anymore. When I took up triathlon three years ago, I rediscovered a part of myself that I thought had died. It has given me a renewed sense of confidence and vigor. It has given me renewed energy and helped me to see that age is a state of mind.

What has been one of the biggest challenges you’ve faced personally as a woman, an athlete, or both?

One of the biggest challenges I have faced as a triathlete is balancing life demands with all of the training and trying to reach my goals. In order to garner and maintain the support of my husband and family, I had to decide that my goal was not going to be “to be the best.” That goal would have required me to put my life on hold to train. Instead, I set the goal that I would “be the best that I could be within the time constraints of my life.” I set realistic goals within those constraints and feel good about what I was accomplishing both at home and in sport.

What are your tips for balancing training with a full life?

I think one of the most important things to remember is that triathlon is not your life, it’s just a part of your life. If you keep that in perspective, things fall into their proper place. You don’t need to fit someone else’s training plan into your life. Do what makes sense for your schedule. For me, that usually means getting up early and getting training in before my kids are up and before work.

What do you wish you’d known when you started triathlon? What’s your best tip for a first-time female triathlete?

I wish I would have known that it is better to go into a race slightly underprepared than it is to go in overtrained. There were so many times when I thought I just needed to get in a few extra miles or to go a little bit faster than planned and then I ended up injured. Now I live by the motto: “train smarter, not harder.” Being strategic in training and listening to your body when it tells you to back off or rest goes a long way toward longevity in the sport and success in reaching your goals.

As part at Women For Tri, we are doing a “Women for Tri Workout Wednesday” where we encourage women to celebrate the day by working out together, empowering each other, and sharing their photos. Is there anything you’d like to to say to all the women working out on that day?

I, too, have a group of friends I train with regularly. We call ourselves the Before Breakfast Club. Getting up early and training with them is therapy for me. I think it is wonderful to train with other women to share ideas, successes and failures, and encouragement. It is a natural forum to learn from each other and to celebrate the achievement of goals. Doing life together with others and building others up makes life worth living.


Shirin Gerami: The first woman to represent Iran in a triathlon.

Has triathlon altered or affected how you see yourself as a woman? If so, how?

It has definitely affected me as a human being. I feel it has given me a more positive outlook on life, and given me more confidence in working hard towards my goals.

What has been one of the biggest challenges you’ve faced personally as a woman, an athlete, or both?

The constant labelling, stereotyping, and boxing into how/what/who I ought to be, and the challenge of concentrating on who I am and the person I want to grow into, rather than binding myself to what other people expect and assume me to be. That has actually been a huge challenge.

What are your tips for balancing training with a full life?

I wish I had the answer! I’m still trying to figure that out myself.

What do you wish you’d known when you started triathlon? What’s your best tip for a first-time female triathlete?

I have loved the journey exactly as it has been. The thrill and curiosity of the unknown, the surprises, the growth, the ups, downs and up-side downs. Passing on what Paula Newby Fraser has always told me: “don’t overthink it.”


Turia Pitt: Inspirational Australian woman who suffered burns to 65% of her body in 2011. She completed two IRONMAN events in 2016.

Has triathlon altered or affected how you see yourself as a woman? If so, how?

It’s given me a lot more confidence and a lot more belief in my abilities, especially since I set the goal of doing an IRONMAN when I was in a hospital bed. I think just having that goal is something massive to work toward. As I got closer and closer to it, it made me believe in myself a lot more. I think having that self belief and self confidence that’s crucial for anyone in all stages of their lives.

What has been one of the biggest challenges you’ve faced personally as a woman, an athlete, or both?

As an athlete, it’s got to be my injuries. I’ve only got three fingers now which makes swimming more difficult, and it’s harder for me to use my bike like a normal person would. As a woman, we have a tendency to not back ourselves and not believe in ourselves and I think that’s a pretty big challenge. And also, because the sport of triathlon is fairly male dominated, even just finding training partners was really difficult for me. I guess I’m luckier than most because my partner was very fit so I’d do a lot of training with him. I still think if there were more women in the sport that would be really good for everyone.

What are your tips for balancing training with a full life?

I think my tip is that I had to learn to let myself off the hook. If I didn’t do very well in a training session or was really tired and didn’t go as hard as I would’ve liked or didn’t eat my recovery meals at the right time—I think you’ve just got to recognize that no one’s perfect and we’re all just doing the best we can. In the scheme of things if you miss a session or your day doesn’t go as planned it’s not the end of the world.

What do you wish you’d known when you started triathlon? What’s your best tip for a first-time female triathlete?

To not take it too seriously. It’s a sport that we all do because we love it, and I think you can forget about that and get really serious. That for me saps all the fun and enjoyment out of it.

As part at Women For Tri, we are doing a “Women for Tri Workout Wednesday” where we encourage women to celebrate the day by working out together, empowering each other, and sharing their photos. Is there anything you’d like to to say to all the women working out on that day?

I’d say dream big, believe in yourself, and know that if you put the work in, you’ll see results!

Originally from: http://www.ironman.com/triathlon/news/articles/2017/03/international-womens-day-round-table.aspx#ixzz4akIexN29

Race IQ is Back at Tailwind Endurance – March 1

Join us on Wednesday, March 1 at 7 p.m. EDT at Tailwind Endurance to discuss the ins, outs and secrets to success at the New York City Triathlon. We will discuss the race course, weekend logistics and some of the insider knowledge about the race weekend such as:

  • Parking and travel tips
  • Where is the hidden port o’ outside of transition
  • Unique aspects of the NYC Tri course that can make or break your day
  • Where to position your friends and family to best see the action

 

We will also feature a panel of athletes that have raced the course and can give you insight into how they raced well in all kinds of New York City conditions!

> REGISTER FOR MARCH 1

Looking for some extra training? Tailwind Endurance offers a variety of classes to get you in shape for race day. Also keep an eye on their full schedule between now and race day for your chance to ride the actual bike course in studio. 

Give the Gift of Triathlon this Holiday Season

Looking for the perfect gift for the triathlete in your life? Order a Life Time Tri gift card!

We are now offering physical gift cards for the following Life Time Tri events:

  • South Beach Triathlon
  • Life Time Tri Marquee
  • Life Time Tri CapTex
  • Life Time Tri Minneapolis presented by Just Bare Chicken
  • Transamerica Chicago Triathlon Mack Cycle
  • Escape to Miami Triathlon presented by Voler

Order your gift cards by 12/20 12:00pm CST to receive them before the holidays!

Click here to ORDER NOW!

*Gift cards will come with unique code on the back for redemption.

Must be redeemed on the corresponding event website that it was originally purchased for.

If you have additional questions, please email us at chicagoregistration@lifetimefitness.com.

Registration Now Open for the 2017 Life Time Tri Series

We invite you to join us as we #CommitToTri in 2017!

Each event features an International distance course, which consists of a 1.5-kilometer swim, a 40-kilometer bike and a 10-kilometer run (distances may vary slightly by location). Select events also offer Sprint, SuperSprint and Kids Triathlon courses of shorter, varying distances.

 

2017 Life Time Tri Series Race Schedule

Event

Date

Register

Life Time Tri South Beach

April 2, 2017

Register Now

Life Time Tri Marquee

April 9, 2017

Register Now

Life Time Tri CapTex

May 29, 2017

Register Now

Life Time Tri Minneapolis

July 8, 2017

Register Now

New York City Triathlon

July 16, 2017

Register Now

Transamerica Chicago Triathlon

August 27, 2017

Register Now

Mack Cycle Escape to Miami Triathlon

September 24, 2017

Register Now

 

To register or learn more about any of the 2017 Life Time Tri events, visit www.LifeTimeTri.com. Stay updated with the latest information by following @LifeTimeTri on Twitter and the Life Time Tri Facebook page.

Registration Now Open for the 2017 Life Time Tri Series

We invite you to join us as we #CommitToTri in 2017!

Each event features an International distance course, which consists of a 1.5-kilometer swim, a 40-kilometer bike and a 10-kilometer run (distances may vary slightly by location). Select events also offer Sprint, SuperSprint and Kids Triathlon courses of shorter, varying distances.

 

2017 Life Time Tri Series Race Schedule

Event

Date

Register

Life Time Tri South Beach

April 2, 2017

Register Now

Life Time Tri Marquee

April 9, 2017

Register Now

Life Time Tri CapTex

May 29, 2017

Register Now

Life Time Tri Minneapolis

July 8, 2017

Register Now

New York City Triathlon

July 16, 2017

Register Now

Transamerica Chicago Triathlon

August 27, 2017

Register Now

Mack Cycle Escape to Miami Triathlon

September 24, 2017

Register Now

 

To register or learn more about any of the 2017 Life Time Tri events, visit www.LifeTimeTri.com. Stay updated with the latest information by following @LifeTimeTri on Twitter and the Life Time Tri Facebook page.